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Haverell, Woodstock and Bath RR 0-40 - History

Haverell, Woodstock and Bath RR 0-40 - History


Haverell, Woodstock and Bath RR 0-40 - History

Location: West of U.S. Route 302 on Pettyboro Road in Bath over the Ammonoosuc River. Style of Bridge: Burr truss with supplemental arches Year of Construction: 1832 Original Cost: Approximately $2,900 Structural Characteristics: The bridge is 374'6" long and is made up of spans of 117'6", 66'6", 62'6", and 80'0". It has an overall width of 24'6", a roadway width of 20'6", and has a maximum vertical clearance of 11'9". It also features an enclosed sidewalk. The bridge is posted as a one lane bridge for six tons, passenger cars only. Maintained By: Town of Bath World Guide Number: 29-05-03 New Hampshire Number: 28

Historical Remarks: The current structure is the fifth bridge to stand on this site. The first was constructed in 1794 at a cost of $366.66. That bridge was demolished by a flood and replaced in 1806 at a cost of $1,000. The second and third bridges were also destroyed by floods but immediately replaced in 1820 and again in 1824. The fourth bridge was destroyed by fire in late 1830. Rebuilding efforts began in March 1831 when $1,400 was allotted to cover the construction of two stone abutments and piers along with the purchase of other materials. In March 1832, an additional $1,500 was allotted to complete the construction. It appears that the fifth bridge was completed by early 1832. When it was first built, the bridge had hewn arches. New overlapping arches were added when the bridge was raised over the railroad in 1920. At one time, there was a sign posted at the bridge which prohibited riding horses across the bridge at a trot. It was believed that the impact of trotting horses could cause the structure to fall apart. The Bath Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

New Hampshire Covered Bridges
Compiled and edited by
Richard G. Marshall
Chief System Planning
New Hampshire Department of Transportation
Color photographs by Arthur F. Rounds
1994


Until 1650, the area of East Haddam was inhabited by at least three tribes of Indians: the Wangunks, the Mohegans and the Nehantics. The Indians called the area "Machimoodus", the place of noises, because of numerous earthquakes that were recorded between 1638 and 1899. Loud rumblings, the "Moodus Noises", could be heard for miles surrounding the epicenter of the quakes near Mt. Tom. The land, which is now Haddam and East Haddam, was purchased by settlers from the natives in 1662 for thirty coats – worth about $100. [2]

Layout of the highways began in 1669 with Creek Row about ¼ mile east of the River and Town Street “The Great Highway” about ¼ mile east of Creek Row. The first permanent settlers established homesteads along Creek Row in 1685. By 1700, there were thirty families living in East Haddam. Agricultural and timber farming, shipbuilding, tanneries and blacksmiths were among the early commerce. Captain John Chapman began ferry service across the Connecticut River in 1695, which ended with the completion of the swing bridge in 1913.

East Haddam was incorporated as a separate town from Haddam in 1734. By 1756, there were nearly 2,000 residents, with the Millington District as the most populated. Growth of commerce brought a surge in population to around 3,000 people by the mid-1800s. In the nineteenth century, Moodus was the “Twine Capital of America,” with twelve mills in operation. [3] Visitors and residents such as actor William Gillette whose castle home was completed in 1914, were drawn to the area known for its rural charm and natural scenery. The growth of the resort areas of Lake Hayward, Bashan Lake and Moodus Reservoir began in the early 1900s and was a booming business for the next fifty years. [4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 56.6 square miles (147 km 2 ), of which, 54.3 square miles (141 km 2 ) of it is land and 2.2 square miles (5.7 km 2 ) of it (3.96%) is water.

Principal communities Edit

Historical population
Census Pop.
17902,749
18002,805 2.0%
18102,537 −9.6%
18202,572 1.4%
18302,664 3.6%
18402,620 −1.7%
18502,610 −0.4%
18603,056 17.1%
18702,951 −3.4%
18803,032 2.7%
18902,599 −14.3%
19002,485 −4.4%
19102,422 −2.5%
19202,312 −4.5%
19302,114 −8.6%
19402,217 4.9%
19502,554 15.2%
19603,637 42.4%
19704,676 28.6%
19805,621 20.2%
19906,676 18.8%
20008,333 24.8%
20109,126 9.5%
2014 (est.)9,127 [5] 0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]

As of the census [7] of 2000, there were 8,333 people, 3,174 households, and 2,285 families residing in the town. The population density was 153.4 people per square mile (59.2/km 2 ). There were 4,015 housing units at an average density of 73.9 per square mile (28.5/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the town was 97.26% White, 0.84% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.46% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.98% of the population.

There were 3,174 households, out of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.0% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $62,304, and the median income for a family was $70,091. Males had a median income of $45,500 versus $36,055 for females. The per capita income for the town was $28,112. About 1.0% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over. 2017 CERT Town Profile, click here. [8]

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 25, 2005 [9]
Party Active Voters Inactive Voters Total Voters Percentage
Democratic 1,529 91 1,620 28.72%
Republican 1,181 56 1,237 21.93%
Unaffiliated 2,598 179 2,777 49.24%
Minor parties 5 1 6 0.11%
Total 5,313 327 5,640 100%
Presidential Election Results [10] [11]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 51.2% 2,980 46.9% 2,731 1.9% 114
2016 45.9% 2,331 49.0% 2,487 5.1% 259
2012 53.0% 2,471 45.2% 2,109 1.8% 82
2008 58.9% 2,874 39.3% 1,918 1.8% 87
2004 55.4% 2,607 42.7% 2,009 1.9% 89
2000 52.8% 2,186 40.7% 1,687 6.5% 271
1996 45.4% 1,663 32.6% 1,193 22.0% 804
1992 37.3% 1,468 26.5% 1,042 36.2% 1,427
1988 45.5% 1,457 53.1% 1,702 1.4% 44
1984 36.9% 1,112 62.7% 1,885 0.4% 11
1980 38.9% 1,104 46.6% 1,324 14.5% 413
1976 50.4% 1,308 49.3% 1,280 0.3% 9
1972 41.2% 968 57.6% 1,353 1.2% 28
1968 49.1% 1,028 44.1% 922 6.8% 143
1964 67.3% 1,243 32.7% 605 0.00% 0
1960 50.2% 930 49.8% 921 0.00% 0
1956 38.1% 647 61.9% 1,049 0.00% 0

Public Edit

The East Haddam Public School System has about 1,100 students in grades PreK–12 about 121 certified teachers, 70 support staff and 7 administrators. Mr. Brian Reas is superintendent of schools. [12] Located in Moodus, Connecticut, the three schools in the public school system are:

  • Nathan Hale-Ray High School (grades 9–12) - about 418 students [13]
  • Nathan Hale-Ray Middle School (Grades 4–8) - about 573 students [14]
  • East Haddam Elementary School (Grades Pre–K3) - about 430 students [15]

Transition Edit

In 2020, The Nathan Hale-Ray High School and Bacon Academy collaborated and made their 18 to 21 transition programs separate from their schools in Colchester, Connecticut


The town was granted to the Rev. Andrew Gardner and 61 others on September 10, 1761 by Governor Benning Wentworth, who named it for William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath. It was first settled in 1765 by John Herriman from Haverhill, Massachusetts. [2] But the terms of the original grant were unfulfilled, so Bath was regranted on March 29, 1769 by Governor John Wentworth. The first census, taken in 1790, recorded 493 residents. [3]

Situated at the head of navigation on the Connecticut River, and shielded from strong winds by the Green Mountains to the west and White Mountains to the east, Bath soon developed into ". one of the busiest and most prosperous villages in northern New Hampshire." [3] Intervales provided excellent alluvial soil for agriculture, and the Ammonoosuc and Wild Ammonoosuc rivers supplied water power for mills. The population reached 1,627 in 1830, when 550 sheep grazed the hillsides. [2] A vein of copper was mined. The White Mountains Railroad up the Ammonoosuc River Valley opened August 1, 1853, shipping Bath's lumber, potatoes, livestock and wood pulp. By 1859, the town had two gristmills and two sawmills. [4] Other industries would include a woolen mill, creamery, distillery and two starch factories. [5]

A disastrous fire swept through Bath village on 1 February 1872, destroying the Congregational church, Bath Hotel and several dwelling houses. The church was rebuilt in 1873. [6] By 1874, Bath was served by the Boston, Concord and Montreal and White Mountains (N.H.) Railroad. [6]

But nearby Woodsville developed into a major railroad junction, and the region's commercial center shifted there. By 1886, once thriving Bath was described as in decay. [3] But this economic dormancy of the Victorian era preserved much early architecture in the village, particularly in the Federal and Greek Revival styles. The Brick Store, built in 1824, is today the oldest continuously operating general store in the United States. [7] The Moses P. Payson Mansion (1810), designed by Alexander Parris, once dominated the town center. But fire and neglect took a heavy toll it is being dismantled for architectural salvage. [8] More fortunate is Bath's Upper Village, a cluster of Federal style houses based on the handbook designs of architect Asher Benjamin. [9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 38.6 square miles (100.0 km 2 ), of which 37.7 square miles (97.6 km 2 ) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km 2 ) is water, comprising 2.31% of the town. [10] The highest points in Bath are a trio of knobs on Gardner Mountain, all found near the northernmost point in town and all measuring slightly greater than 1,980 feet (600 m) above sea level. The Connecticut River forms the western boundary of the town the Ammonoosuc and Wild Ammonoosuc rivers flow through the town. Bath lies fully within the Connecticut River watershed. [11]

Geologically, Bath is located at the northernmost extent of former Lake Hitchcock, a post-glacial lake that shaped the Connecticut River valley from this point south to Middletown, Connecticut. [12]

The town is crossed by U.S. Route 302 and New Hampshire Route 112. The village of Swiftwater is located along Route 112, near the town's boundary with Haverhill.

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790498
1800825 65.7%
18101,316 59.5%
18201,498 13.8%
18301,627 8.6%
18401,591 −2.2%
18501,574 −1.1%
18601,366 −13.2%
18701,168 −14.5%
18801,032 −11.6%
1890935 −9.4%
19001,006 7.6%
1910978 −2.8%
1920838 −14.3%
1930785 −6.3%
1940686 −12.6%
1950706 2.9%
1960604 −14.4%
1970607 0.5%
1980761 25.4%
1990784 3.0%
2000893 13.9%
20101,077 20.6%
2017 (est.)1,089 [13] 1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [14]

As of the census [15] of 2000, there were 893 people, 350 households, and 253 families residing in the town. The population density was 23.4 people per square mile (9.0/km 2 ). There were 450 housing units at an average density of 11.8 per square mile (4.5/km 2 ). The racial makeup of the town was 99.33% White, 0.22% African American, 0.22% Native American, and 0.22% from two or more races.

There were 350 households, out of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.7% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 24.3% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 29.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.1 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $43,088, and the median income for a family was $47,000. Males had a median income of $27,679 versus $22,167 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,916. About 2.8% of families and 5.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.


Contents

Settled by citizens from Haverhill, Massachusetts, the town was first known as Lower Cohos. It was incorporated in 1763 by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth, and in 1773, became the county seat of Grafton County. Haverhill was the terminus of the old Province Road, which connected the northern and western settlements with the seacoast. By 1859, when the town had 2,405 inhabitants, industries included 3 gristmills, 12 sawmills, a paper mill, a large tannery, a carriage manufacturer, an iron foundry, 7 shoe factories, a printing office, and several mechanic shops. [3] The town is home to the oldest documented covered bridge in the country still standing—the Haverhill–Bath Bridge, built in 1829.

The village of Woodsville, named for John L. Woods of Wells River, Vermont, was once a very important railroad center. Woods operated a sawmill on the Ammonoosuc River, and developed a railroad supply enterprise following the establishment of the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad. The village of Pike was settled by future employees of the Pike Manufacturing Company, which was once the world's leading manufacturer of whetstones.

While the village of Haverhill Corner was historically considered to be the major settlement in town, the town's municipal offices are currently located in the village of North Haverhill, with Grafton County's offices and courthouse located just two miles farther north along Route 10. Woodsville served as the county seat until 1972, when the administrative offices relocated to rural land halfway between Woodsville and the smaller village of North Haverhill.

The village of Woodsville is now the commercial center of Haverhill and its smaller surrounding towns, including several in Vermont. Woodsville is home to the town's supermarkets, pharmacies, banks (including the headquarters of the regional Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank), state liquor store, and most of its restaurants and chain stores, although a few are located in North Haverhill. In 2008, Wal-Mart opened a Supercenter location in Woodsville. The town's elementary and high schools, along with Cottage Hospital, a critical-access hospital serving the area, are all located in Woodsville.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 52.1 square miles (134.9 km 2 ), of which 51.0 square miles (132.1 km 2 ) is land and 1.1 square miles (2.8 km 2 ) is water, comprising 2.15% of the town. [4] Bounded on the west by the Connecticut River, Haverhill is drained by the Ammonoosuc River, in addition to Oliverian Brook and Clark Brook. Haverhill lies fully within the Connecticut River watershed. [5]

The highest point in Haverhill, at 2,320 feet (710 m) above sea level, is on the western slope of Black Mountain, whose 2,830 ft (860 m) summit is in the neighboring town of Benton.

The town is served by six state-maintained routes. New Hampshire Route 10 is the main north–south highway through Haverhill, paralleling the Connecticut River. U.S. Route 302 enters from Vermont and passes east–west through Woodsville in the northern part of town, joining with Route 10 to head northeast to Bath and Littleton. New Hampshire Route 25 enters Haverhill from Piermont while co-signed with Route 10, splitting off by itself to the southeast in Haverhill Corner. New Hampshire Route 116 has its southern terminus at Route 10 in North Haverhill, and New Hampshire Route 135 has its southern terminus at Route 10 just south of Woodsville. A very short section of New Hampshire Route 112 cuts through the northeastern part of town. Haverhill also has easy access to U.S. Route 5 in Vermont via bridges in North Haverhill and Woodsville.

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790552
1800805 45.8%
18101,105 37.3%
18201,609 45.6%
18302,183 35.7%
18402,675 22.5%
18502,405 −10.1%
18602,291 −4.7%
18702,271 −0.9%
18802,455 8.1%
18902,545 3.7%
19003,414 34.1%
19103,498 2.5%
19203,406 −2.6%
19303,665 7.6%
19403,487 −4.9%
19503,357 −3.7%
19603,127 −6.9%
19703,090 −1.2%
19803,445 11.5%
19904,164 20.9%
20004,416 6.1%
20104,697 6.4%
2017 (est.)4,574 [6] −2.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,697 people, 1,928 households, and 1,208 families residing in the town. There were 2,379 housing units, of which 451, or 19.0%, were vacant. 294 of the vacant units were for seasonal or recreational use. The racial makeup of the town was 96.7% white, 0.4% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 0.3% some other race, and 1.2% from two or more races. 1.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [8]

Of the 1,928 households, 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were headed by married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.3% were non-families. 29.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.4% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29, and the average family size was 2.80. [8]

In the town, 19.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.4% were from 18 to 24, 23.4% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 18.7% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.0 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.9 males. [8]

For the period 2011-2015, the estimated median annual income for a household was $48,405, and the median income for a family was $56,100. Male full-time workers had a median income of $42,363 versus $33,150 for females. The per capita income for the town was $24,493. 15.1% of the population and 9.9% of families were below the poverty line. 26.7% of the population under the age of 18 and 5.3% of those 65 or older were living in poverty. [9]


Contents

Woodsville was named for John L. Woods, a figure in its early development. He arrived from Wells River, Vermont, a village across the Connecticut River narrows in Newbury, and in 1829 purchased a sawmill which had been operating on the Ammonoosuc River since 1811. He manufactured pine lumber, and opened a store in his house. [3] Spring snowmelt carried log drives down the Connecticut and Ammonoosuc rivers. A log boom was built across the Connecticut River to Wells River to hold the logs briefly for sorting. Logs not destined for Woods' mill were released gradually to avoid jams in the Ox Bow meadow downstream. Log drivers detailed to work at the boom enjoyed Woodsville's saloons and red-light district. [4]

The Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad opened at Woodsville in 1853 and built its division offices and a branch repair shop. It replaced the original 1805 bridge between the states with a two-level span, featuring a toll highway below and railroad tracks on the roof. [5] The village boomed into an important railway town and junction, endowed with fine examples of Victorian architecture. It also became a center for legal affairs. The log drives were stopped after 1915, when pleasure boat owners complained about the hazards to navigation. [6] In 1889, the Grafton County Court moved from Haverhill Corner to Woodsville, where it remained until moving halfway to North Haverhill in 1972. [7]

Woodsville is in the northwest corner of the town of Haverhill, bordered to the north by the town of Bath and to the west by the Connecticut River, which forms the state border with Vermont. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.90 square miles (2.34 km 2 ), of which 0.88 square miles (2.28 km 2 ) are land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km 2 ), or 2.23%, are water. [8] The Ammonoosuc River runs just north of the CDP and reaches its confluence with the Connecticut River at the northernmost point in the community.

Woodsville is crossed by U.S. Route 302 and by state routes 10 and 135. US 302 leads northeast 21 miles (34 km) to Littleton and west across the Connecticut River to Wells River, Vermont and 3 miles (5 km) to Interstate 91. Route 10 leads south from Woodsville 37 miles (60 km) to Hanover, and Route 135 leads north 20 miles (32 km) to Interstate 93 northwest of Littleton.

Woodsville serves as the commercial center for the town of Haverhill and the surrounding communities, including several just to the west in Vermont. Many of the town's commercial businesses, including supermarkets, sit-down and fast-food restaurants, and banks, are located near the junction of US 302 and NH 10. Cottage Hospital, a critical-access hospital serving the area, is also located in Woodsville.

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,126 people, 482 households, and 293 families residing in the CDP. There were 558 housing units, of which 76, or 13.6%, were vacant. The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.5% white, 0.2% African American, 0.5% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% some other race, and 1.9% from two or more races. 1.2% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [1]

Of the 482 households in the CDP, 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.1% were headed by married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.2% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.8% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34, and the average family size was 2.87. [1]

23.9% of residents in the CDP were under the age of 18, 9.4% were from age 18 to 24, 26.3% were from 25 to 44, 28.1% ere from 45 to 64, and 12.3% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.0 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males. [1]

For the period 2011-15, the estimated median annual income for a household was $40,708, and the median income for a family was $34,635. The per capita income for the CDP was $14,945. About 28.4% of the population and 20.3% of families were below the poverty line, including 40.1% of those under age 18. [9]

    (1894–1980), professor and research scientist at Vanderbilt University , relief pitcher with the Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, Atlanta Braves, and Houston Astros , pitcher with the Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Detroit Tigers , columnist and author [10]

In The Stand by Stephen King, Woodsville is mentioned as the home of Glen Pequod Bateman, a major character in the novel. He was an associate professor of sociology at the fictional Woodsville Community College when the superflu hit. [ citation needed ]


Haverell, Woodstock and Bath RR 0-40 - History

In Landaff?
Editor's note: This article appeared in the Bridge Weekly
Sho-Case and is used with permission.

Long-time Hanover historian and Upper Valley architect, Jay Barrett, is the presenter of a very popular and favorite course, The History of Dartmouth College and Hanover, New Hampshire 1761 to Present, offered by the Institute for Lifelong Education at Dartmouth (ILEAD). Barrett, who lives in Ely, was pleasantly surprised to see an aerial view in the August 25 edition of The Bridge Weekly Sho-case which showed the Connecticut River winding its way through North Haverhill and Newbury. The picture coincided perfectly with the third session of Barrett’s ILEAD course which covered Dartmouth College’s history from 1770-1780, during which time Haverhill and Newbury offered portions of prime land on both sides of the Connecticut River’s Great Oxbow to the College to entice its settlement in Haverhill. The aerial view made a good addition to Barrett’s presentation which already included a highlighted map showing the lots Haverhill pitched to the College Trustees in 1770 based on a “Plan of the original site of Dartmouth College” shown in A History of Dartmouth College and the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire to 1815 by Frederick Chase. Barrett finds the comparison between the two images fascinating, even to the point that the hedgerows are still obvious 241 years later. Also fascinating is how close Haverhill and other towns in the Upper Valley came to being able to call their town home to Dartmouth College.


Click for larger version of this map

Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, the founder of Dartmouth College, was a 1733 Yale graduate and ordained minister who established Moor’s Indian Charity School in Lebanon Crank (now known as Columbia), Connecticut in 1755 and was looking to expand his school. New Hampshire’s Royal Governor John Wentworth had a deep interest in what Wheelock was doing, and they worked together to get a charter for the college. Wentworth understood that it would be beneficial to have the college in New Hampshire. Massachusetts had Harvard, and Connecticut had Yale, so Wheelock knew he probably would not get a charter in those states. In December of 1769, Rev. Eleazar Wheelock obtained a Royal Charter for Dartmouth College from Governor John Wentworth, and many towns including those in the Upper Connecticut River Valley immediately starting bidding for the school to settle in their town as their asset. Wheelock’s representatives had secured the funding from Scotland and England, and that turned out to be the easy part of the plan. Wheelock was not prepared for the difficult process of deciding where to build the college.


Click for enlarged image

Orford was one town that put together a lucrative offer of 2,100 acres, labor, and money, but it wasn’t as lucrative as Haverhill’s offer which included 5,000 acres in Haverhill, Newbury, and Bath as well as pledging local money. Hanover offered 3,000 contiguous acres. Complicating the issue, the unsettled and forfeited township of Landaff chartered in 1764 by King George III was regranted to Dartmouth College on January, 19, 1770. Governor Wentworth was in favor of Dartmouth College being built in Landaff, because it was unsettled and could be governed by the College, and Wentworth wanted to push the school north to increase development. In the end the Dartmouth College was built in Hanover, but the closest it came to settling anywhere else in the Upper Valley was in Landaff, where the college spent $7,000 to $10,000 on land improvements, building of roads, mills, and construction of a grammar school in 1780 which it operated for over two years.

Wheelock wanted the college to be in Hanover for a number of reasons. Hanover made its proposal in March of 1770, the strongest offer at that time. The town was on the Connecticut River, which was crucial, and it was at the head of the falls, the place where all supplies would be portaged regardless of where they were going. Hanover would be the closest. There was also a narrow place in the river for a future bridge, now the site of Ledyard Bridge. Wheelock was more comfortable with the settlers in Lower Coos since they were from his home state of Connecticut, and settlers in Haverhill and farther north were predominately from Massachusetts.

Haverhill prepared deeds which included the offer of a farm of about 600 acres within the two Oxbows of the Connecticut River, with a barn, corn barn, grist mill, sawmill, and house thereon. North Haverhill could have been the home to Dartmouth College, but Wheelock saw enough suitable crop land in Hanover and wasn’t as interested in Haverhill’s lush Oxbows.

Wentworth and Wheelock were both diplomats. Wentworth wanted the college to be built in Landaff, but Wheelock told him he really wanted it in Hanover. All the towns were disappointed when they learned that on July 5, 1770 Wheelock announced, from the steps of Gov. John Wentworth’s mansion, that he would choose Hanover as the home of his new college. “It was almost like two different value systems. It had to have played on Wheelock’s mind that he was familiar with the settlers in Hanover. He knew them. He went with what he identified with and needed,” says Barrett.

The site of Dartmouth College was fixed in Hanover, and the first buildings were erected in August of 1770. Wheelock laid out the village of Hanover based on the goods and services needed for the college. Land was cleared, mills built, and farms, taverns and other establishments were settled.

While the college was growing in Hanover, it continued to make improvements in Landaff. The improvements proved enticing to the grantees who had forfeited the 1764 Landaff charter. Until 1791 the college continued to have a presence in Landaff expending more money on improvements as well as fighting tenacious claims on the first grant. Materials in the Rauner Special Collections Library at Dartmouth College Library reveal many interesting details about the College’s presence in Landaff. One accounting for the period from June 1773 to January 1775 lists provisions sent to Landaff from Dartmouth College such as beef, pork, sugar, chocolate, molasses, clover seed, and payment for labor in building a saw mill. In a letter dated January 1774, Wentworth wrote to Wheelock “conveying this certain intelligence” that the regranting of Landaff was done in a lawful manner, and prior grantees could not prove that their title was still good. “Landaff may thence be safely improved by you for the college without any further consideration. Of this I have been long certain.” The letter is signed “Your affectionate friend, Wentworth.”

By 1774, twenty families had settled in Landaff, and a huge parcel had been laid off in one body on the Ammonoosuc River at the northwest corner of the town for the College farm. A saw mill was built in 1774, and a grist mill was built in 1775 on the north side of Mill Brook about one-half mile from Lisbon. A 1785 manuscript map shows the mill site near the present intersection of Route 10 and Mill Brook Road in Landaff.


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The College Trustees resolved in 1780 to build a grammar school in Landaff and endow it with the same privileges as Wheelock’s former Moor’s School in Connecticut. The school was to be named Phillip’s School and be 38’ x 28’ and one story high. Weekly tuition was set at 1 shilling and 6 pence for students instructed in the learned language and rules of English grammar, 1 shilling and 3 pence for arithmetic, 10 pence for reading and writing, and 8 pence for reading English. The school was to be supported by tuition, rents of the College farm, sawmill, sale of the corn mill, and sale of land for settlement. What is puzzling is that the Dartmouth College Trustees chose to go to the expense of erecting a public grammar school in Landaff in 1780 in connection with the College even though there was much disruption and expense caused from the original grantees’ claims, and Dartmouth College had already established itself ten years earlier in Hanover. There is the possibility that the Landaff settlement and rents would help support the college, and the grammar school’s namesake, John Phillips, a College Trustee, took great interest in the township of Landaff because of the eventual support it would give the college. There is also the possibility that the Trustees were staying true to their resolution that the object of settling Landaff was the promotion of learning and religion.

A 1788 Deposition of Wheelock’s son-in-law, Bezaleel Woodward, reveals the efforts Dartmouth College made in improving Landaff. According to Woodward’s deposition, from 1772 to 1774 a considerable number of settlers were placed in Landaff by Wheelock, and a saw mill and corn mill were erected. Considerable improvements were made on a parcel called the College farm, and a log house and large frame barn erected thereon. Within those years, about 1,500 acres in Landaff were disposed of by Wheelock as agent for the College Trustees, to encourage settlement. By 1775 about 1,000 pounds had been expended, and only one claimant had ever come forward.

By August of 1791, the Trustees of Dartmouth College yielded that the title of the first grant would prevail and supporting the second grant would not only be expensive but imprudent and greatly injurious to the college. The Trustees resolved unanimously that the board disclaim, forfeit and relinquish all right, title and interest to the Landaff township. An estimate of $10,000 was spent on improvements and expenses to maintain the title to the Landaff charter. Perhaps the college itself might not have made it had it been built there. We can only imagine how different the landscape of Orford, Haverhill, or Landaff and their surrounding communities would look had they been the chosen site for Dartmouth College, or how different the College would be today.

Barrett maintains that Dartmouth College’s success is due in part to where it ended up being located. In the beginning the school lived from year to year and was almost bankrupted after the Revolutionary War. The turning point was in 1893 when William Tucker became the President of Dartmouth College. He realized expansion was needed which revolutionized the school resulting in a larger campus and endowments. It didn’t hurt that former N.H. Governor and White House Chief of Staff Sherman Adams and former N.H. Governor Lane Dwinell, both Dartmouth graduates, and former Lebanon attorney and U.S. Senator Norris Cotton used their influence to change the course of Interstate 89 in the mid 1960s so it didn’t bypass Hanover.

When Barrett drives up Route 10, he can’t help but look at The Ridge in Orford or the fertile land in North Haverhill and wonder what those towns would look like today if Dartmouth College had chosen them. “At the end of the day, Wheelock made the right decisions. Those reasons are still valid today. Wheelock knew what he was doing,” says Barrett.


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40 Valley Road, Haverhill, NH 03785 (MLS# 4741603) is a Single Family property that was sold at $168,500 on May 31, 2019. Want to learn more about 40 Valley Road? Do you have questions about finding other Single Family real estate for sale in Haverhill? You can browse all Haverhill real estate or contact a Coldwell Banker agent to request more information.

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Copyright © 2021 New England Real Estate Network, Inc. All rights reserved. This information is deemed reliable, but not guaranteed. The data relating to real estate displayed on this site comes in part from the IDX Program of NEREN. The information being provided is for consumers’ personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. Data last updated Jun 19 2021 9:44PM

Listing data is derived in whole or in part from the Maine IDX & is for consumers' personal, noncommercial use only. Dimensions are approximate and not guaranteed. All data should be independently verified. © 2021 Maine Real Estate Information System, Inc. All Rights Reserved This web site does not display complete Listings. Certain Listings of other real estate brokerage firms have been excluded. Coldwell Banker Realty - 180 Main Street, Saco, ME 04072

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The property listing data and information (in part) set forth herein were provided to MLS Property Information Network, Inc. from third party sources, including sellers, lessors and public records, and were compiled by MLS Property Information Network, Inc. The property listing data and information are for the personal, non commercial use of consumers having a good faith interest in purchasing or leasing listed properties of the type displayed to them and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties which such consumers may have a good faith interest in purchasing or leasing. MLS Property Information Network, Inc. and its subscribers disclaim any and all representations and warranties as to the accuracy of the property listing data and information set forth herein.

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First granted in 1763, Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth named the town Peeling after an English town. Many of the first colonists were originally from Lebanon, Connecticut. In 1771, his nephew, Governor John Wentworth, gave it the name Fairfield, after Fairfield, Connecticut. The town was renamed Woodstock in 1840 for Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, England, possibly due to the popularity of the 1826 Walter Scott novel Woodstock. [2] [3]

Logging became a principal early industry, with sawmills established using water power from the Pemigewasset River. The entrance of the railroad in the 19th century opened the wilderness to development, carrying away wood products to market. It also brought tourists, many attracted by paintings of the White Mountains by White Mountain artists. Several inns and hotels were built to accommodate the wealthy, who sought relief from the summer heat, humidity and pollution of coal-age Boston, Hartford, New York and Philadelphia. They often relaxed by taking carriage rides through the White Mountains, or by hiking along the Lost River in Lost River Reservation. But with the advent of automobiles, patrons were no longer restricted by the limits of rail service. Consequently, many grand hotels established near depots declined and closed. Woodstock, however, remains a popular tourist destination.

The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, an outdoor laboratory for ecological studies founded by the United States Forest Service in 1955, is located in the southern part of town.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 59.2 square miles (153 km 2 ), of which 58.7 sq mi (152 km 2 ) is land and 0.5 sq mi (1.3 km 2 ) is water, comprising 0.84% of the town. Woodstock is drained by the Pemigewasset River. The town's highest point is the summit of Mount Jim, at 4,172 feet (1,272 m) above sea level, a spur of Mount Moosilauke.

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840472
1850418 −11.4%
1860476 13.9%
1870405 −14.9%
1880367 −9.4%
1890341 −7.1%
1900628 84.2%
19101,083 72.5%
1920684 −36.8%
1930756 10.5%
1940981 29.8%
1950894 −8.9%
1960827 −7.5%
1970897 8.5%
19801,008 12.4%
19901,167 15.8%
20001,139 −2.4%
20101,374 20.6%
2017 (est.)1,363 [4] −0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,374 people, 624 households, and 353 families residing in the town. There were 1,421 housing units, of which 797, or 56.1%, were vacant. 701 of the vacant units were for seasonal or recreational use. The racial makeup of the town was 96.9% White, 0.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 0.1% some other race, and 1.8% from two or more races. 0.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. [6]

Of the 624 households, 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were headed by married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.4% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.2% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20, and the average family size was 2.77. [6]

In the town, 19.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% were from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.5 males. [6]

For the period 2011-2015, the estimated median annual income for a household was $49,063, and the median income for a family was $62,500. Male full-time workers had a median income of $33,750 versus $44,034 for females. The per capita income for the town was $30,671. 8.0% of the population and 2.4% of families were below the poverty line. 7.5% of the population under the age of 18 and 5.0% of those 65 or older were living in poverty. [7]


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146 Woodstock St, Haverhill, MA 01832 (MLS# 72453495) is a Single Family property that was sold at $400,000 on April 30, 2019. Want to learn more about 146 Woodstock St? Do you have questions about finding other Single Family real estate for sale in Haverhill? You can browse all Haverhill real estate or contact a Coldwell Banker agent to request more information.

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Listing data is derived in whole or in part from the Maine IDX & is for consumers' personal, noncommercial use only. Dimensions are approximate and not guaranteed. All data should be independently verified. © 2021 Maine Real Estate Information System, Inc. All Rights Reserved This web site does not display complete Listings. Certain Listings of other real estate brokerage firms have been excluded. Coldwell Banker Realty - 180 Main Street, Saco, ME 04072

The data relating to real estate for sale on this site comes from the Broker Reciprocity (BR) of the Cape Cod & Islands Multiple Listing Service, Inc. Summary or thumbnail real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Coldwell Banker Realty are marked with the BR Logo and detailed information about them includes the name of the listing broker. Neither the listing broker nor Coldwell Banker Realty shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, or misprints and shall be held totally harmless. This site was last updated Jun 18 2021 12:59PM. All properties are subject to prior sale, changes, or withdrawal.

The property listing data and information (in part) set forth herein were provided to MLS Property Information Network, Inc. from third party sources, including sellers, lessors and public records, and were compiled by MLS Property Information Network, Inc. The property listing data and information are for the personal, non commercial use of consumers having a good faith interest in purchasing or leasing listed properties of the type displayed to them and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties which such consumers may have a good faith interest in purchasing or leasing. MLS Property Information Network, Inc. and its subscribers disclaim any and all representations and warranties as to the accuracy of the property listing data and information set forth herein.

Boundaries © 2014-2018 Pitney Bowes Inc. All rights reserved.

Home Partners of America and A New Path to Homeownership are registered trademarks of Home Partners of America LLC.

Coldwell Banker Realty and Guaranteed Rate Affinity, LLC share common ownership and because of this relationship the brokerage may receive a financial or other benefit. You are not required to use Guaranteed Rate Affinity, LLC as a condition of purchase or sale of any real estate. Operating in the state of New York as GR Affinity, LLC in lieu of the legal name Guaranteed Rate Affinity, LLC.

Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker.

© 2021 Coldwell Banker. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker logos are trademarks of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. The Coldwell Banker® System is comprised of company owned offices which are owned by a subsidiary of Realogy Brokerage Group LLC and franchised offices which are independently owned and operated. The Coldwell Banker System fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act.


Watch the video: History Bites: Woodstock (January 2022).