History Podcasts

Dutch Golden Age: Crash Course

Dutch Golden Age: Crash Course

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While the English were falling apart a little, with their civil war and their restoration and their succession problems, the Dutch were getting their act together. They were throwing off the yoke of the Spanish Empire, uniting their provinces, and building out their global trade network. Today, we'll learn about how the Dutch came to their Golden Age, and how it ended.

Sources
-Hunt, Lynn. Making of the West. Peoples and Cultures. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2019.
-Parker, Geoffrey. Global Crisis: War, Climate Change and Catastrophe in the Seventeenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014.
-Popkin, Richard. The History of Scepticism: From Savonarola to Bayle. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.
-Rommelse, Gijs. "The role of mercantilism in Anglo-Dutch political relations, 1650–74." Economic History Review 63#3 (2010) pp. 591–611.
-Smith, Bonnie G. Modern Empires Reader. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017.


(Disclaimer: This post may contain affiliate links in which I may receive a small commission for items purchased through those links. For more information, please see Disclosure Policy.)

Supplies:

    (We do an average of one chapter per week, but if chapters are unusually short we may double up in one week, or if there is a lot of content to cover, we extend into multiple weeks.)
  • Binder or notebook for notes, maps, lapbook pieces, timeline, tests, etc. (It’s helpful to keep everything together in one place.)

Activities are aimed at elementary age

Activities for middle school age and up

Activities for high school age range

Activities for both age ranges

(I will continue to update as we work through these chapters and I find more resources to incorporate, as well as add pictures. Starting with this book,we also added vocabulary work to each chapter. At some point, I will go back and add vocabulary to the earlier chapters and books as well.)

Options for each chapter:

  • Read chapter
  • Answer review questions from activity book either written or orally (I usually write the questions in the notebook, leaving space between each for them to write the answers. It takes a little extra time to write the questions myself, but it helps me keep up to date with what they are learning and to know what to ask about.)
  • Vocabulary (I got this Free Vocabulary Resource Pack from Homeschool Giveaways to have a place to write the words and it has a few different page options to choose what you like/think will work best for your child.)
  • Map work from activity book
  • Coloring page from activity book
  • Pick a craft project from activity book or Timeline Cards(We stapled the printable timeline inside the back cover of the notebook and add pages as we need them by taping them to the last one. It will end up accordion-like.)(Credit- I found and downloaded the lapbook pages from a blog that is no longer online-Run of the Mill Family. I did not create these pieces and am not taking credit for them, but I still wanted to share them as a great resource.)
  • Chapter Test

Introduction

  • Vocabulary: explorer, continent,
  • Copy oceans limerick into notebook (P.11)
  • List the 5 oceans and 7 continents in notebook or label them on a map

Ch.1 A World of Empires

  • Vocabulary: conquistador, encomienda, (for younger kids, you could just talk about/introduce the word without writing it, while older kids could write the words in notebook along with definitions)
  • Lapbook piece (P.2- Link above in Options for each chapter)
  • Watch ‘Crash Course US History #1- The Black Legend, Native Americans, and Spaniards’
  • Khan Academy: Watch Spain, Portugal, and the creation of a global economy
  • Try the Europe Countries Map Quiz Game(Don’t worry about a low score. The more you do it, the better you will get.)
  • Additional books to add to weekly reading or for research:

Ch. 2 Protestant Rebellions

  • Vocabulary: provinces, dikes, petition, regent
  • Watch ‘Ten Minute History-The Dutch Revolt (Short Documentary)’**
  • Read about Mary, Queen of Scots
  • Read about Mary, Queen of Scots
  • Lapbook piece (P.3)
  • Watch ‘Mary, Queen of Scots’ [Jenny from the Block parody]**
    (Don’t worry about a low score. The more you do it, the better you will get.)
  • Watch Witchcraft: Crash Course European History #10** (This video isn’t specifically related to this chapter, but happened over the time period of the last dozen or so chapters. This topic hasn’t specifically been mentioned in the book.)

Ch. 3 James, King of Two Countries

  • Vocabulary: coronation, Parliament, colony
  • Read about Jamestown Settlement
  • Watch ‘King James, History Videos for Kids’**
  • Read about Jamestown Fort
  • Build a triangle shaped fort (like Jamestown) – you could use cardboard, popsicle sticks,toothpicks, etc.
  • Watch ‘America-The Story of US: Life in Jamestown**
  • Lapbook piece (P.4)
  • Additional books to add to weekly reading or for research:
  • Our Strange New Land: Elizabeth’s Jamestown Colony Diary, Book 1 (My America)
  • The Starving Time: Elizabeth’s Jamestown Colony Diary, Book 2 (My America)

Ch. 4 Searching for the Northwest Passage

  • Vocabulary: scurvy, adventurous, mutiny, channel
  • Read about Samuel Champlain
  • Watch ‘Samuel de Champlain-Explorer-Mini Bio’**
  • Lapbook piece (P.5)
  • Additional books to add to weekly reading or for research:
    • Samuel de Champlain: From New France to Cape Cod (In the Footsteps of Explorers)
    • Henry Hudson: Seeking the Northwest Passage (In the Footsteps of Explorers)

    Ch. 5 Warlords of Japan

    Ch. 6 New Colonies in the New World

    • Vocabulary: Puritan, pilgrims, treaty, plentiful, merchant
    • Read about the Wampanoag
    • Watch ‘Who Were the Wampanoag?’(Study.com is a paid subscription site, but you do not need one to watch the video.)
    • Read about the Lenape
    • Print and complete Squanto worksheet
    • Watch A Charlie Brown This Is America, Charlie Brown The Mayflower Voyagers(25 minutes)
    • Watch ‘Crash Course US History #2- When is Thanksgiving? Colonizing America’**
    • Watch ‘Animated Hero Classics- William Bradford’/William Bradford Activity Guide
    • Watch ‘Desperate Crossing – The Untold Story of the Mayflower’(37 minutes)
    • Read ‘On the Mayflower: Desire Minter, Passenger’
    • Take a Virtual Field Trip of The Mayflower
    • Read about Colonial America: (Each of these pages also has a link for a 10-question quiz at the bottom of them)
    • Daily Life:
    • Try cooking a colonial recipe
      • More Colonial/Early America Recipes
      • Lapbook piece (P.7)
      • Additional books to add to weekly reading or for research:
      • You Wouldn’t Want to Sail on the Mayflower
      • If You Sailed on the Mayflower in 1620

      Ch. 7 The Spread of Slavery

      • Vocabulary- wretched, tobacco, indentured servant, slave
      • Read about Colonial America: (Page has a link for a 10-question quiz at the bottom)
        • Slavery
        • Complete Read, Watch, and Practice sections
          (Don’t worry about a low score. The more colonies we cover and the more you play it, the better you will get.)
      • Lapbook piece (P.8)
      • Additional books to add to weekly reading or for research:
      • Ch. 8 The Middle of the East

        • Vocabulary- empire, quarrel
        • Watch Eastern Europe Consolidates: Crash Course European History #16**

        Ch. 9 The Western War

        • Vocabulary- defenestration, electors, covetous
        • Watch ‘Crash Course World History #219- Charles V and the Holy Roman Empire’**
          (Don’t worry about a low score. The more you do it, the better you will get.)
    • Watch The 17th Century Crisis: Crash Course European History #11**

    • Dutch Golden Age: Crash Course European History

      Typisch Amerikaans filmpje, volgens mij verschilt het weinig van wat Carl Sagan 20-30 jaar geleden beweerde.

      Een paar van de opvallendste fouten:

      De Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden had 8 provincies, niet 7. Drente was alleen zo arm en onbelangrijk dat ze niet 'telden' en ook geen zetel hadden in de Staten-Generaal.

      Er was geen Nederlandse grondwet tot 1798. Het gebruik van de term "constitutionalisme" is typisch angelsaksisch en niet erg correct.

      De aanstichter van de Frans-Nederlandse Oorlog (1672-1679) was Frankrijk. Het is sowieso gek om het niet over Lodewijk XIV te hebben, aangezien zijn inval in het Rampjaar (1672) het einde van de Gouden Eeuw inluidde.

      Helemaal bizar is hoe 1688 wordt afgeschilderd als een interne Engelse kwestie en hier verder niet aan bod komt. De Frans-Duitse inval in 1672 en de bijkomende Derde Engelse Zeeoorlog leverde de Republiek een enorme schuld op (die uiteindelijk door de Belgen is afbetaald!). Maar daarvoor veroverde Willem III Engeland met twee keer zoveel troepen en drie keer zoveel schepen als de Spaanse Armada.

      De Republiek was lang niet zo tolerant als de (tevens Protestantse) Amerikanen beweren. Alleen de staatskerk en het Jodendom mochten openlijk zichtbaar zijn. Zelfs andere Protestantse stromingen werden niet in het openbaar geduld. Katholieken werden door de Geuzen onderdrukt en zelf gemarteld en vermoord. De gebieden waar ze woonden stonden onder directe controle van de Staten-Generaal - waar ze zelf geen zetels in hadden. Hun kerken werden afpakt en ze moesten verscholen samenkomen. Bovendien zaten ze niet veilig achter een waterlinie dus hadden zij het meeste last van de strijd op het land.

      De gebroeders De Witt zijn mogelijk door een complot omgebracht en de Frans-Duitse inval had meer te maken met hun dood dan dat ze de prins zijn macht zouden onthouden.

      Willem Van Nassau erfde het Franse prinsdom Orange en nam die titel, naam en lijfspreuk aan. Vandaar "Van Oranje" en "Je maintiendrai". Overigens is het gebied al meer dan 300 jaar (sinds 1713) bij Frankrijk. Beetje zielig dus om die titel aan te houden.


      Religion

      One of the characteristic aspects of modern Dutch society began to evolve in this period—the vertical separation of society into “ pillars” (zuilen) identified with the different Dutch religions. Calvinist Protestantism became the officially recognized religion of the country, politically favoured and economically supported by government. But the Reformed preachers were thwarted in their efforts to oppress or drive out other religions, to which a far-reaching toleration was extended. Mass conversion to Calvinism had been confined mainly to the earlier decades of the Eighty Years’ War, when Roman Catholics still frequently bore the burden of their preference for the rule of the Catholic monarchs in the southern Netherlands. Sizable islands of Roman Catholicism remained in most of the United Provinces, while Gelderland and the northern parts of Brabant and Flanders conquered by the States General were overwhelmingly Roman Catholic, as they remain today.

      Although public practice of Catholicism was forbidden, interference with private worship was rare, even if Catholics sometimes bought their security with bribes to local Protestant authorities. Catholics lost the traditional form of church government by bishops, whose place was taken by a papal vicar directly dependent upon Rome and supervising what was in effect a mission the political authorities were generally tolerant of secular priests but not of Jesuits, who were vigorous proselytizers and were linked to Spanish interests. Protestants included, along with the predominant Calvinists of the Reformed Church, both Lutherans in small numbers and Mennonites (Anabaptists), who were politically passive but often prospered in business. In addition, the Remonstrants, who were driven out of the Reformed Church after the Synod of Dort (Dordrecht 1618–19), continued as a small sect with considerable influence among the regents.

      There were also other sects emphasizing mystical experiences or rationalist theologies, notably the Collegiants among the latter. Jews settled in the Netherlands to escape persecution the Sephardic Jews from Spain and Portugal were more influential in economic, social, and intellectual life, while the Ashkenazim from eastern Europe formed a stratum of impoverished workers, especially in Amsterdam. Despite unusually open contacts with the Christian society around them, Dutch Jews continued to live in their own communities under their own laws and rabbinic leadership. Successful though some Jews were in business, they were by no means the central force in the rise and expansion of Dutch capitalism. Indeed, no clear pattern can be detected of religious affiliation affecting the growth of the Dutch business community if anything, it was the official Dutch Reformed Church that fulminated most angrily against capitalist attitudes and practices, while the merely tolerated faiths often saw their adherents, to whom economic but not political careers were open, prospering and even amassing fortunes.


      Experience the Dutch Golden Age in these cities

      Middelburg in the Dutch Golden Age

      Travel back to the Dutch Golden Age in Middelburg and explore its rich trading history.

      Dordrecht: cradle of the Golden Age

      Take a stroll through Golden Age Dordrecht and discover a city which shaped Dutch history.

      Vermeer&rsquos Delft in the Golden Age

      Discover Delft, home of Vermeer and William of Orange, of Delft Blue pottery, and Golden Age art.

      Golden Age The Hague: art & power

      Meet the &lsquoGirl with a Pearl Earring&rsquo and see the palaces on a tour of Golden Age The Hague.

      Rembrandt&rsquos Leiden

      Discover Golden Age Leiden, an era of trade, science, tolerance and world-changing art.

      Frans Hals&rsquo Golden Age Haarlem

      Step back into the Golden Age and discover the art and people that shaped Haarlem 400 years ago.

      Amsterdam: capital of the Golden Age

      Explore the Golden Age in Amsterdam, when world trade, incredible wealth and famous art converged.

      Hoorn & Enkhuizen in the Golden Age

      Return to 17th-century Hoorn and Enkhuizen. Relive this prosperous era in Holland&rsquos history.


      Who Even Is An Entrepreneur?: Crash Course Business – Entrepreneurship #1

      You’ve probably heard the word “Entrepreneur” thrown around a lot in business. It conjures images of Elon Musk, Bill Gates, or Oprah Winfrey. But, it goes way beyond that. In this episode of Crash Course Business: Entrepreneurship, Anna helps us to figure out who Entrepreneurs are, and what that title actually means.

      Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse

      Thanks to the following patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

      Eric Prestemon, Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Timothy J Kwist, Brian Thomas Gossett, Haxiang N/A Liu, Jonathan Zbikowski, Siobhan Sabino, Zach Van Stanley, Bob Doye, Jennifer Killen, Nathan Catchings, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Erika & Alexa Saur, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, David Noe, Shawn Arnold, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Jirat, Ian Dundore


      Dutch Golden Age: Crash Course - History

      1 heb ik zo geen idee wat het is. De rest geloof ik goed op naam te hebben gebracht. Edit. 1 en 4 aangepast

      1.vink (vrouwtje) of tjiftjaf 2. Halsbandparkiet. 3.pimpelmees. 4. Grote bonte specht. 5. Koolmees. 6.spreeuw. 7. Ekster. 8. Roodborst. 9. Groenling. 10. Tortelduif. 11. Houtduif. 12.putter.

      Ik denk dat 1 een Tjiftjaf is.

      Lijkt erop! Het is een vink. Dat kun je zien aan de snavel. De vink is een zaadeter en heeft daarom een dikke snavel. Een tjiftjaf is een insecteneter en heeft een dun & fijn snaveltje.

      Nigeria welcomes Germany's decision to return looted Benin Bronzes

      This is going to be likely unpopular here but I think the looting of imperial nations is justified in longterm by the fact they at least preserved these items while who knows what would have happened to many priceless artefacts in the turbulent XXth century of Africa and the Middle-East.

      Obviously lot of stuff was destroyed or disappeared too in WW2, there is no such thing as total safety but I'm most certain these items had better chances in European museums than wherever they would have been kept in their original locales. Here in Hungary for example despite the bombings and ferocious siege of Budapest the National Museum's artefacts survived mostly unharmed and the Soviet officers respected the expertise of Hungarian museologists and could strike a deal of mixed (Soviet-Hungarian) guard for the duration of occupation, so much that some wannabe looter Soviet soldiers were chased away at gunpoint by their offiers. I'm not sure such agreements could have been possible in post-colonial, civil war-torn African countries.

      Of course now that safety is improving talks of giving back can begin, but there still needs to be tight security oversight.


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      Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these Late Middle Ages Section 5 Guided Answers I can get now!

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      wtf this great ebook for free?!

      My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

      It's very easy to get quality ebooks )

      so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

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      I found the segment about the political machines in New York interesting because Green pointed out that even a corrupt institution such as the machine did some good things. In class as well as in the textbook, political machines are always depicted as corrupt (which they are), savage, and undemocratic. However, we never talk about the possible good that the machines accomplish such as giving back to the immigrant community, possibly one of the most undeserved groups of people in the country at that time. So, with this detail considered, it is very unsurprising that machines were able to consolidate power so quickly and as easily: they had the support of the immigrant community.

      It is very interesting to think about how corrupt New York City politicians were, and it was even more interesting to see how all of these corrupt politicians thought that they were doing the right thing. For instance, there is no such thing as honest graft, this was just George Plunkitt’s justification for his corruption. I think that the Gilded Age created the idea that it was okay to be corrupt in politics and in business. Although it has not been completely translated to todays world, there still seems to be a massive push to be extremely rich, and once you get rich you do whatever you can to stay rich.

      The Gilded Age is quite an interesting era. By understanding the results of this era, one can understand why this era was called “Gilded” rather than “Golden.” Sure, this age did bring about beneficial political and social reform which benefits workers even today, but it was also terribly corrupt. I like this video because it presents both sides of this time period, which is especially visible when talking about political machines. Of course, we can see the most famous example of corruption in machine politics (that being Tammany Hall of New York and William “Boss” Tweed), but these machines can’t be completely labeled evil because of the good they accomplished for immigrants and other people in need (which is also the reason they were able to succeed). Corruption during this time period was also seen in the political deals during Ulysses Grant’s presidency, including the Credit Mobilier scandal and the scandal involving the Whiskey Ring.

      I thought it was worrying to see how much of America was manipulated by corruption from politics to the construction of the railroad. It is also disappointing to see how much taxpayers were manipulated in this system such as in the construction of the county courthouse where a job that should have taken 250,000 dollars to complete ended up costing several million. Especially when they spent over 40,000 dollars on cleaning supplies. Boss tweed and the machine, in general, did help out the community but it does not nearly make up for how much they swindled out of it.


      Watch the video: Dutch Golden Age: Crash Course European History #15 (January 2022).