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Bibliotheca Historica

Bibliotheca Historica


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Ancient Greek historian. Known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica, in forty books, fifteen of which survive intact, between 60 and 30 BC. The history broke new ground in not being Hellenocentric, partly because of Stoic influences on his belief in the brotherhood of all men. Wikipedia

Work aiming at the presentation of a history of all of mankind as a whole, coherent unit. A universal chronicle or world chronicle typically traces history from the beginning of written information about the past up to the present. Wikipedia

Considered the founding work of history in Western literature. Written in 430 BC in the Ionic dialect of classical Greek, The Histories serves as a record of the ancient traditions, politics, geography, and clashes of various cultures that were known in Greece, Western Asia and Northern Africa at that time. Wikipedia

Ancient history as a term refers to the aggregate of past events from the beginning of writing and recorded human history and extending as far as post-classical history. The phrase may be used either to refer to the period of time or the academic discipline. Wikipedia

Indo-European people who inhabited large parts of Eastern and Southeastern Europe in ancient history. Thracians resided mainly in the Balkans, but were also located in Asia Minor and other locations in Eastern Europe. Wikipedia

Period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome known as the Greco-Roman world. Period in which both Greek and Roman societies flourished and wielded great influence throughout much of Europe, Northern Africa, and Western Asia. Wikipedia

Work by Pliny the Elder. One of the largest single works to have survived from the Roman Empire to the modern day and purports to cover all ancient knowledge. Wikipedia

Or was an island described as a tin trading centre in the Bibliotheca historica of the Sicilian-Greek historian Diodorus Siculus, writing in the first century BC. Widely accepted to have been an island somewhere off the southern coast of what is now England, scholars continue to debate its precise location. Wikipedia

Maritime history dates back thousands of years. In ancient maritime history, evidence of maritime trade between civilizations dates back at least two millennia. Wikipedia

Study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches. Wikipedia

The history of Europe concerns itself with the discovery and collection, the study, organization and presentation and the interpretation of past events and affairs of the people of Europe since the beginning of written records. During the Neolithic era and the time of the Indo-European migrations, Europe saw human inflows from east and southeast and subsequent important cultural and material exchange. Wikipedia

Civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. undefined AD 600). Wikipedia

Empire covering much of Southern Europe, Western Europe, Near East and North Africa to its fall in the 5th century AD, the political history of Ancient Rome was closely entwined with its military history. Aggregate of different accounts of the Roman military's land battles, from its initial defense against and subsequent conquest of the city's hilltop neighbors on the Italian peninsula, to the ultimate struggle of the Western Roman Empire for its existence against invading Huns, Vandals and Germanic tribes. Wikipedia

Ancient Greek historian known for his universal history. Limited. Wikipedia

First printed edition of the work, that previously had existed only in manuscripts, which could be circulated only after being copied by hand. That of Demetrius Chalcondyles, now thought to be from 1488. Wikipedia

The history of cartography traces the development of cartography, or mapmaking technology, in human history. Maps have been one of the most important human inventions for millennia, allowing humans to explain and navigate their way through the world. Wikipedia

Repetition of similar events in history. The concept of historic recurrence has variously been applied to the overall history of the world (e.g., to the rises and falls of empires), to repetitive patterns in the history of a given polity, and to any two specific events which bear a striking similarity. Wikipedia

Description of humanity's past. Informed by archaeology, anthropology, genetics, linguistics, and other disciplines and, for periods since the invention of writing, by recorded history and by secondary sources and studies. Wikipedia

Fictional island mentioned in an allegory on the hubris of nations in Plato's works Timaeus and Critias, where it represents the antagonist naval power that besieges "Ancient Athens", the pseudo-historic embodiment of Plato's ideal state in The Republic. In the story, Athens repels the Atlantean attack unlike any other nation of the known world, supposedly bearing witness to the superiority of Plato's concept of a state. Wikipedia

Greek historian of the Hellenistic period noted for his work The Histories, which covered the period of 264–146 BC in detail. The work describes the rise of the Roman Republic to the status of dominance in the ancient Mediterranean world. Wikipedia

This timeline of ancient history lists historical events of the documented ancient past from the beginning of recorded history until the Early Middle Ages. Millennia: Wikipedia


Diodorus Siculus

Books eleven to twenty, which are completely intact and cover events between BC and BC, maintain this annalistic structure. But she, because of her strength of body and marvellous comeliness, was so haughty that dioforus kept refusing every man who wooed her in marriage, since she believed that no one of her wooers was worthy of her.

The account is largely based on Hieronymus of Cardia. Click on a word to bring up parses, dictionary entries, and frequency statistics. Diodorus offers the only chronological survey of the period of Philipand supplements the writers mentioned and contemporary sources in many matters.

These books bibliotheeca not survive intact, but large sections are preserved by Byzantine compilers working under Constantine VII and by epitomators like Photius. This city is a colony of the Romans, and because of its convenient situation it possesses the finest market to be found in those regions.

The largest one of those which flow into our waters is the Rhone, which has its sources in the Diodoeus and empties into the sea by five mouths.

Books twenty-one to forty, which brought the work down to Diodorus’ own lifetime, terminating around 60 BC, are mostly lost. In Greece, revolts against the Athenians, various wars outbreak of the Peloponnesian War. And this was the reason why the Phoenicians, as they transported this silver to Greece and Asia and to all other peoples, acquired great wealth.

The murder of Roxane and her son Alexander. The book is devoted to two parallel narratives, one describing Agathocles’ ultimately unsuccessful invasion of Carthage, and the other devoted to the continued wars of the Diadochi, which are dominated by Antigonus Monophthalmus and Demetrius Poliorcetes. Athens the victor in the naval battle of Aeginusae she puts her generals to death, and loses the battles that follow: India, Scythia, Arabia, and the islands of the Ocean.

Alexander in Babylon the burning of Persepolis death of Darius. This transcription has been minutely proofread. They bring along to war also their free men to serve them, choosing them out from among the poor, and these attendants they use in battle as charioteers and as shield-bearers.

Library of History, Volume XI — Diodorus Siculus | Harvard University Press

Seleucus gains control of Babylon. The majority of the book is devoted to the history of the Assyriansfocussed on the mythical conquests of Ninus and Semiramisthe fall of the dynasty under the effeminate Sardanapallusand the origins of the Medes who overthrew them.

Books six to ten, which covered the transition from mythical times to the archaic periodare almost entirely lost. Diodorus asserts that he devoted thirty years to the composition of his history, and that he undertook a number of dangerous journeys through Europe and Asia in prosecution of his historical researches. They are also boasters and threateners hisrorica are fond of pompous language, and yet they have sharp wits and are not without cleverness at learning.

The rise of Agathocles, tyrant of Syracuse. Caesar, Gallic War6.

Greek English Quick Synopsis onsite Remacle. The conspiracy of Parmenio.

In a word, this island is well supplied with springs of sweet water which not only makes the use of it enjoyable for those who pass their life there but also contribute to the health and vigour of their bodies. The rest of the book is devoted to Egypt and is divided into two halves. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Books II-V cover a wide range, and because of their inclusion of much mythological material are of much less value.

These are the Scilly Isles, lying just off the tip of Cornwall the ancients considered them as off Spain because of the easy access to them by way of the coast of Spain and the Bay of Biscay. In this book, Diodorus describes the geography of North Africa including Ethiopiathe gold mines of Egypt, the Persian Gulf and Libyawhere he sites mythical figures including the HisoricaAmazonsAmmon and Atlas. The thicker the border, the more information. Sacks considers this idea about the fall of empires to be a core theme of Diodorus’ work, motivated by his own bbiliotheca as a subject of Rome.

Diodorus’ universal historywhich he named Bibliotheca historica Greek: And almost all of them become frozen over by the cold and thus bridge their own streams, and since the natural smoothness of the ice makes the crossing slippery for those who pass over, they sprinkle chaff diodorhs it and thus have a crossing which is safe.


Structure

In the Bibliotheca historica, Diodorus sets out to write a universal history, covering the entire world and all periods of time. Each book opens with a table of its contents and a preface discussing the relevance of history, issues in the writing of history or the significance of the events discussed in that book. These are now generally agreed to be entirely Diodorus' own work. [1] The degree to which the text that follows is derived from earlier historical works is debated.

The first five books describe the history and culture of different regions, without attempting to determine the relative chronology of events. Diodorus expresses serious doubts that such chronology is possible for barbarian lands and the distant past. The resulting books have affinities with the genre of geography. Books six to ten, which covered the transition from mythical times to the archaic period, are almost entirely lost. By book ten he had taken up an annalistic structure, [2] narrating all the events throughout the world in each year before moving on to the next one. Books eleven to twenty, which are completely intact and cover events between 480 BC and 302 BC, maintain this annalistic structure. Books twenty-one to forty, which brought the work down to Diodorus' own lifetime, terminating around 60 BC, are mostly lost. [3]

Book I: Egypt

Book one opens with a prologue on the work as a whole, arguing for the importance of history generally and universal history in particular. The rest of the book is devoted to Egypt and is divided into two halves. In the first half he covers the origin of the world and the development of civilisation in Egypt. A long discussion of the theories offered by different Greek scholars to explain the annual floods of the River Nile serves to showcase Diodorus' wide-reading. In the second half he presents the history of the country, its customs and religion, in a highly respectful tone. His main sources are believed to be Hecataeus of Abdera and Agatharchides of Cnidus. [4]

Book II: Asia

This book has only a short prologue outlining its contents. The majority of the book is devoted to the history of the Assyrians, focussed on the mythical conquests of Ninus and Semiramis, the fall of the dynasty under the effeminate Sardanapallus, and the origins of the Medes who overthrew them. This section is explicitly derived from the account of Ctesias of Cnidus (chapters 1-34). [5] The rest of the book is devoted to describing the various other peoples of Asia. He first describes India, drawing on Megasthenes (chapters 35-42), [6] then the Scythians of the Eurasian steppe, including the Amazons and the Hyperboreans) (chapters 43-47) and Arabia Felix (chapters 48-54). He finishes the book with an account of the traveller Iambulus' journey to a group of islands in the Indian Ocean, which appears to be based on a Hellenistic utopian novel.

Book III: Africa

In this book, Diodorus describes the geography of North Africa including Ethiopia, the gold mines of Egypt, the Persian Gulf and Libya, where he sites mythical figures including the Gorgons, Amazons, Ammon and Atlas. Based on the writings on Agatharchides, Diodorus describes gold mining in Egypt, with horrible working conditions:

And those who have been condemned in this way—and they are a great multitude and are all bound in chains—work at their task unceasingly both by day and throughout the entire night . For no leniency or respite of any kind is given to any man who is sick, or maimed, or aged, or in the case of a woman for her weakness, but all without exception are compelled by blows to persevere in their labours, until through ill-treatment they die in the midst of their tortures. [7]

Book IV: Greek mythology

In this book, Diodorus describes the mythology of Greece. He narrates the myths of Dionysus, Priapus, the Muses, Herakles, the Argonauts, Medea, the hero Theseus and the Seven against Thebes.

Book V: Europe

In this book, Diodorus describes the geography of Europe. He covers the islands of Sicily, Malta, Corsica, Sardinia and the Balearic Islands. He then covers Britain, 'Basilea', Gaul, the Iberian peninsula, and the regions of Liguria and Tyrrhenia in the Italian peninsula. Finally he describes the islands of H|iera and Panchaea in the southern ocean, and the Greek islands.

Books VI-X: Trojan War and Archaic Greece

Books VI - X survive only in fragments, which cover events before and after the Trojan War including the stories of Bellerophon, Orpheus, Aeneas, and Romulus some history from cities including Rome and Cyrene tales of kings such as Croesus and Cyrus and mentions of philosophers such as Pythagoras and Zeno.

Book XI: 480-451 BC

This book has no prologue, just a brief statement of its contents.

The main focus of the book are events in mainland Greece, principally the Second Persian invasion of Greece under Xerxes (1-19, 27-39), Themistocles' construction of the Peiraeus and Long walls and his defection to Persia (41-50, 54-59) and the Pentecontaetia (60-65, 78-84, 88). Interweaved with this is an account of events in Sicily, focussing on Gelon of Syracuse's war with the Carthaginians (20-26), his successors' prosperity and fall (51, 53, 67-68), and the Syracusans' war with Ducetius (76, 78, 88-92).

Diodorus' source for his account of mainland Greece in this book is generally agreed to be Ephorus of Cyme, but some scholars argue that he supplemented this using the accounts of Herodotus, Thucydides, and others. [8]

Book XII: 450-416 BC

The book's prologue muses on the mutability of fortune. Diodorus notes that bad events can have positive outcomes, like the prosperity of Greece which (he says) resulted from the Persian Wars.

Diodorus account mostly focusses on mainland Greece, covering the end of the Pentecontaetia (1-7, 22, 27-28), the first half of the Peloponnesian War (30, 31-34, 38-51, 55-63, 66-73), and conflicts during the Peace of Nicias (74-84). Most of the side narratives concern events in southern Italy, relating to the foundation of Thurii (9-21, 23, 35) and the seccession of the Plebs at Rome (24-25). An account of the war between Leontini and Syracuse, culminating in the embassy of Gorgias to Athens (54-56), sets up the account of the Sicilian Expedition in book XIII.

Diodorus is believed to have continued to use Ephorus, perhaps supplemented with other historians, as his source for Greek events in this book, while the source for the events in western Greece is usually identified as Timaeus of Tauromenium. [9]

Book XIII: 415-404 BC

The short prologue to this book explains that, due to the amount of material to be covered, there is not space for an extended prologue in this book.

This book opens with the account of the Sicilian Expedition, culminating in two very long speeches at Syracuse deliberating about how to treat the Athenian prisoners (1-33). After that the two areas again diverge, with the Greek narrative covering the Decelean War down to the battles of Arginusae and Aigospotami (35-42, 45-53, 64-74, 76-79). The Sicilian narrative recounts the beginning of the Second Carthaginian War, culminating in the rise of Dionysius the Elder to the tyranny (43-44, 54-63, 75, 80-96, 108-114).

Ephorus is generally agreed to have continued to be the source of the Greek narrative and Timaeus of the Sicilian narrative. The source of the Sicilian expedition is disputed - both Ephorus and Timaeus have been put forward. [10] Sacks argues that the two speeches at the end of that account are Diodorus' own work. [11]

Book XIV: 404-387 BC

In the prologue, Diodorus identifies reproachful criticism (blasphemia) as the punishment for evil deeds which people take to heart the most and which the powerful are especially subject to. Powerful men, therefore, should avoid evil deeds in order to avoid receiving this reproach from posterity. Diodorus claims that the central subjects of the book are negative examples, who demonstrate the truth of these remarks.

The book is again divided into Greek and Sicilian narratives. The Greek narrative covers the thirty tyrants of Athens (3-6, 32-33), the establishment and souring of the Spartan hegemony (10-13, 17, 34-36, 38), Cyrus the Younger's attempt to seize the Persian throne with the aid of the Ten Thousand (19-31), Agesilaus' invasion of Persian Asia Minor (79-80), the Boeotian War (81-86, 91-92, 94).

The Sicilian narrative focusses on Dionysios the Elder's establishment of his tyranny in Sicily (7-9, 11-16, 18), his second war with the Carthaginians (41-78, 85-91, 95-96), and his invasion of southern Italy (100-108, 111-112).

Fairly brief notes mention Roman affairs year by year, including the war with Veii (93), and the Gallic Sack (113-117).

Ephorus and Timaeus are assumed to have still been Diodorus' sources. [12]

Book XV: 386-361 BC

In the prologue of this book, Diodorus makes several statements that have been considered important for understanding the philosophy behind his entire work. Firstly, he announces the importance of parrhesia (free speech) for the overall moral goal of his work, insofar as he expects his frank praise of good people and criticism of bad ones will encourage his readers to behave morally. Secondly, he declares that the fall of the Spartan empire, which is described in this book, was caused by their cruel treatment of their subjects. Sacks considers this idea about the fall of empires to be a core theme of Diodorus' work, motivated by his own experience as a subject of Rome. [13]

This book covers the height of the Spartan rule in Greece, including the invasion of Persia, the Olynthian War, and the occupation of the Cadmeia (8-12, 18-23), but also the Spartan defeat in the Boeotian War which resulted in the rise of the Theban Hegemony (25-35, 37-40, 62‑69, 75, 82‑88). The main side narratives are Euagoras war with the Persians in Cyprus (2‑4, 8‑9), the wars of Dionysius I against the Illyrians, Etruscans and Carthaginians and his death (13-17, 73-74), Artaxerxes II's failed invasion of Egypt (41-43), the skytalismos in Argos (57-58), the career of Jason of Pherae (57, 60, 80, 95), and the Great Satraps' Revolt (90-93).

Diodorus' main source is generally believed to have been Ephorus, but (through him?) he also seems to have drawn on other sources, like the Hellenica Oxyrhynchia. [14] It is disputed whether he continued using Timaeus of Tauromenium for his description of Sicilian affairs in this book or if this too was based on Ephorus. [15]

Book XVI: 360‑336 BC

The Prologue announces the importance of cohesion within narratives - a book or chapter should, if possible, narrate an entire story from start to finish. It then transitions into praise of Philip II, whose involvement in the Third Sacred War and resulting rise are the main subjects of the book.

The principal side narratives are Dion of Syracuse's overthrow of Dionysius II (5-6, 9-15), the Social War (7, 21-22), Artaxerxes III's reconquest of Egypt (40-52), and the expedition of Timoleon (interleaved in 65-90).

The initial sources for the main narrative was probably Ephorus, but his account came to an end in 356 BC, and Diodorus' sources after that point are disputed. Possibilities include Demophilus, Diyllus, Duris of Samos and Theopompus contradictions in his account suggest that he was following multiple sources simultaneously and did not succeed in combining them perfectly. [16] The Sicilian material probably draws on Timaeus and also cites de  (Athanis) . [17]

Book XVII: 335‑324 BC

This book covers Alexander the Great from his accession, through his campaigns in Persia, to his death in Babylon. Despite a promise in the brief prologue to discuss other contemporary events, it does not contain any side-narratives, although, unlike other accounts of Alexander, it does mention Macedonian activities in Greece during his expedition. Owing to its length, the book is split into two halves, the first running down to the Battle of Gaugamela (1-63) and the second part continuing until his death (64-118).

Diodorus' sources for the story of Alexander are much debated. Sources of information include Aristobulus of Cassandreia, Cleitarchus, Onesicritus and Nearchus, but it is not clear that he used these directly. [18] Several scholars have argued that the unity of this account implies a single source, perhaps Cleitarchus. [19]

Book XVIII: 323-318 BC

This book covers the years 323 BC-318 BC, describing the disputes which arose between Alexander's generals after his death and the beginning of the Wars of the Diadochoi. The account is largely based on Hieronymus of Cardia. [20] There is no discussion of events outside the eastern Mediterranean, although cross-references at other points indicate that Diodorus intended to discuss Sicilian affairs.

Book XIX: 317-311 BC

This book opens with a prologue arguing that democracy is usually overthrown by the most powerful members of society, not the weakest, and advancing Agathocles of Syracuse as a demonstration of this proposition.

The narrative of the book continues the account of the Diadochi, recounting the Second and Third Wars of the Diadochi the Babylonian War is completely unmentioned. Interwoven in this narrative is the rise to power of Agathocles of Syracuse and the beginning of his war with Carthage. It is disputed whether this latter narrative strand is based on Callias of Syracuse, Timaeus of Tauromenium, or Duris of Samos.

Book XX: 310-302 BC

The prologue of this book discusses Greek historians' practice of creating inventing speeches for their characters to deliver. Diodorus criticises the practice as inappropriate to the genre, but acknowledges that in moderation such speeches can add variety and serve a didactic purpose.

The book is devoted to two parallel narratives, one describing Agathocles' ultimately unsucessful invasion of Carthage, and the other devoted to the continued wars of the Diadochi, which are dominated by Antigonus Monophthalmus and Demetrius Poliorcetes. The only significant side narrative is the account of Cleonymus of Sparta's wars in Italy (104-105).

Books XXI-XL

These books do not survive intact, but large sections are preserved by Byzantine compilers working under Constantine VII and by epitomators like Photius. They covered the history of the Hellenistic kingdoms from the Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC, through the wars between Rome and Carthage, down to either 60 BC or the beginning of Caesar's Gallic War in 59 BC.

For books 21-32, Diodorus drew on the history of Polybius, which largely survives and can be compared against Diodorus' text, though he may also have used Philinus of Agrigentum and other lost historians. Books 32 to 38 or 39 probably had Poseidonius as their source. [21]


Diodorus Siculus: Historical Library

The doings of Cassander: The most nearly complete text is at Remacle. Hide browse bar Your current position in the text is marked in blue. Work on the site was cut short by Prof.

Consequently many of the Italian traders, induced by the love of money which characterizes them, believe that the love of wine of these Gauls is their own godsend.

LacusCurtius • Diodorus Siculus — Book V Chapters 19‑40

They use chariots, for instance, in their wars, even as tradition tells us the old Greek heroes did in sicklus Trojan War, and their dwellings are humble, being built for the most part out of reeds or logs. War between Carthage and Sicily, won by Gelon.

The marvels of India. This text is part of: Then they work the tin into pieces the size of knuckle-bones and convey it to an island which lies off Britain and is called Ictis 19 for at the time of ebb-tide the space between this island and the mainland becomes dry and they can take the tin sicullus large quantities over to the island on their wagons.


Library of History, Volume XI

For it was their thought that, since they were masters of the sea, they would thus be able to move, households and all, to an island which was unknown to their conquerors. Rise of Athens under Themistocles, construction of the Piraeus. The book is devoted to two parallel narratives, one describing Agathocles’ ultimately unsuccessful dodorus of Carthage, and the other devoted to the continued wars of the Diadochi, which are diodirus by Antigonus Monophthalmus and Demetrius Poliorcetes.

In the prologue, Diodorus identifies reproachful criticism blasphemia as the punishment for evil deeds which people take to blbliotheca the most and which the powerful are especially subject to.

Click anywhere in the line to jump to another position: Consequently, diodorua they are eating, their moustaches become entangled in the food, and diodorys they are drinking, the beverage passes, as it were, through a kind of a strainer. Consequences of the Athenian defeat in the Syracusan War. Siculis inhabitants of Britain who dwell about the promontory known as Belerium 17 are especially hospitable to strangers and have adopted a civilized manner of life because of their intercourse with merchants of other peoples.

The Prologue announces the importance of cohesion within narratives – a book or chapter should, if possible, narrate an entire story from start to finish. Current location in this text. To the fifty years from to BC Thucydides devotes only a little more than thirty chapters Diodorus covers it more fully He finishes the book with an account of the traveller Iambulus ‘ journey to a group of islands in the Indian Oceanwhich appears to be based on a Hellenistic utopian novel.

Struggles of successors of Alexander after his death.

LacusCurtius • Diodorus Siculus — Book V Chapters 19‑40

The career of Alexander: Davies, Roman Mines in Europep Books twenty-one to forty, which brought the work down to Diodorus’ own lifetime, terminating around 60 BC, are mostly lost. This transcription has been minutely proofread. This page was last edited historjca 22 Novemberat Introduction, text, and translation by Ctesias by Jan P.

Books eleven to twenty, which are completely intact and cover events between BC and BC, maintain this annalistic structure. At a later time Caesar conferred Roman citizenship on the city.

And this brigandage they continually practise in a spirit of complete disdain for using as they do light arms and being altogether nimble and swift, they are a most difficult people for other men to subdue.

Interweaved with this is an account of events in Sicily, focussing on Gelon of Syracuse ‘s war with the Carthaginianshis successors ‘ prosperity and fall 51, 53,and the Syracusans’ war with Ducetius 76, 78, The murder of Roxane and her son Alexander.

Powerful men, therefore, should avoid evil deeds in order to avoid receiving this reproach from posterity.

These men sing to the accompaniment of instruments which are like lyres, fiodorus their songs may be either of praise or of obloquy. The Romans war against the Samnites. The Sacred War and Philip’s involvement in Greek affairs.

Diodorus Siculus : Books 33 – 40

They wear rough black cloaks, the wool of which resembles the hair of goats. This book opens with a prologue arguing that democracy is usually overthrown by the most powerful members of society, not the weakest, and advancing Agathocles of Syracuse as a demonstration of this proposition.

His First Book, which deals almost exclusively with Egypt, is the fullest literary account of the history and customs of that country after Herodotus.

Also many Romans, distinguished men who have performed great deeds, have offered vows to this god, and these vows they have performed after the completion of their successes. There is also no complete Greek text at a single site anywhere, and in fact Book 16 seems to be altogether missing from the Web. And almost all of them become frozen over by the cold and thus bridge their own streams, and since the natural smoothness of the ice makes the crossing slippery for those who pass over, they sprinkle chaff on it and thus have a crossing which is safe.

Books six to ten, which covered the transition from mythical times to the archaic periodare almost entirely lost. Diodorus offers the only chronological survey of the period of Philipand supplements the writers mentioned and contemporary sources in many matters. Sacks considers this idea about the fall of empires to be a core theme of Diodorus’ work, motivated by his own experience as a subject of Rome.


Bibliotheca Historica: voluminis XI pars I

Struve, Burcard Gotthelff. Budero, Christi Gottlieb. Meuselio, Ioanne Georgio

Published by Lipsiae: sumtu Librariae Weidmannianae, 1802

Seller: MW Books Ltd
New York, NY, U.S.A.

First Edition. Poor copy with wear, tear and dust-dulling as with age. Text remains clear and without blemish. Physical description 558 pages. Subjects Historical Library. 1 Kg.


1699 THE HISTORICAL LIBRARY OF DIODORUS THE SICILIAN 1ST ENGLISH EDITION MAPS FOLIO LEATHER EGYPT PERSIA WAR HISTORY

1699/1700 Diodorus Siculus, George Booth 1st English Edition London, Printed by Edw. Jones for Awnsham and John Churchil Folio Leather, Re-backed w/spine laid down Illustrated Maps 28/797/24 Pages w8.3"xh12.7" Extremely Rare!

•Beautiful folio full leather, Blind stamped floral boards, •Re-backed spine with leather laid down, Faint floral stamped binding, •Marble end pages, Three required maps (2 two-page, 1 folding), •Separate title pages, And a Fascinating Read, •In early modern English on handmade paper! •Very Rare, No others for Sale According to ESTC only around 50 are in housed in Institutions around the World!

•The historical library of Diodorus the Sicilian in fifteen books : the first five contain the antiquities of Egypt, Asia, Africa, Greece, the Islands, and Europe. •The last ten, an historical account of the affairs of the Persians, Grecians, Macedonians and other parts of the world. •To which are added the fragments of Diodorus that are found in the Bibliotheca of Photius, Together with those publish'd by H. Valesius, L. Rhodomannus, and F. Ursinus.

•Bibliotheca historica, is a work of universal history by Diodorus Siculus. It consisted of forty books, which were divided into three sections. The first six books are geographical in theme, and describe the history and culture of Egypt (book I), of Mesopotamia, India, Scythia, and Arabia (II), of North Africa (III), and of Greece and Europe (IV–VI). In the next section (books VII–XVII), he recounts the history of the world starting with the Trojan War, down to the death of Alexander the Great. •The last section (books XVII to the end) concern the historical events from the successors of Alexander down to either 60 BC or the beginning of Caesar's Gallic War in 59 BC. (The end has been lost, so it is unclear whether Diodorus reached the beginning of the Gallic War, as he promised at the beginning of his work, or, as evidence suggests, old and tired from his labors he stopped short at 60 BC.) He selected the name "Bibliotheca" in acknowledgement that he was assembling a composite work from many sources. The authors he drew from, who have been identified, include: Hecataeus of Abdera, Ctesias of Cnidus, Ephorus, Theopompus, Hieronymus of Cardia, Duris of Samos, Diyllus, Philistus, Timaeus, Polybius and Posidonius.

•Diodorus Siculus (fl. 1st century BC) or Diodorus of Sicily was a Greek historian. He is known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica, much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. It is arranged in three parts. The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troy, arranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India and Arabia to Greece and Europe. The second covers the Trojan War to the death of Alexander the Great. The third covers the period to about 60 BC. Bibliotheca, meaning 'library', acknowledges that he was drawing on the work of many other authors.

•Condition is Fair/Good. Some wear to edges, abrasions/wear to boards, faint gold labeling to spine, signature to upper title page, pages are age toned/brown throughout, some blemishing, tattered edge to a few index pages, old tape repair to last index page near top, some pages are darker than other, hinges/text block are very good!


Diodorus Siculus

The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troyarranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India and Arabia hustorica Greece and Europe. The Sicilian narrative recounts the beginning of the Second Carthaginian Warculminating in the rise of Dionysius the Elder to the tyranny, 75, So far indeed did the merchants go in their greed that, in case their boats were fully laden and there still remained a great amount of silver, they would hammer the lead off the anchors and have the silver perform the service of the lead.

Greek Wikisource has original text related to this article: It is arranged in three parts.

It is also their custom, when they are formed for battle, to step out in front of the line siculue to challenge the most valiant men from among bjbliotheca opponents to single combat, brandishing their weapons dikdorus front of them to terrify their adversaries.

Diodorus’ universal historywhich he named Binliotheca historica Greek: It was from these mines, that is, that they drew their continued growth, hiring the ablest mercenaries to be sidulus and winning with their aid many and great wars.

This book has only a short prologue outlining its contents. Of the authors he drew from, some who have been identified include: The marvels of India. This island stretches obliquely along the coast of Europe, and the point where it is least distant from the mainland, we are told, is the promontory which men call Cantium, 10 and this is about one hundred stades from the land, 11 at the place where the sea has its outlet, 12 whereas the second promontory, known as Belerium, 13 diodors said to be a voyage of four days from the mainland, and the last, writers tell us, extends out into the open sea and is named Orca.

Interweaved with this is an account of events in Sicily, focussing on Gelon of Syracuse ‘s war with the Carthaginianshis successors ‘ prosperity and fall 51, 53,and the Syracusans’ war with Ducetius 76, 78, In the prologue of this book, Diodorus makes several statements that have been considered important for understanding the philosophy behind his entire work.

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Then they work the tin into pieces the size of knuckle-bones and convey it to an island which lies off Britain and is called Ictis 19 for at the time of ebb-tide the space between this island and the mainland becomes dry and they can take the tin in large quantities over to the island on their wagons.

And after being storm-tossed for many days they were carried ashore on the island we mentioned above, and when they had observed its felicity and nature they caused it to be known to all men.

Owing to its length, the book is split into two halves, the first running down to the Battle of Gaugamela and the second part continuing until his death Ptolemy against Cilicia, the Carthaginians against Sicily dioxorus Agathocles’ mixed successes against them.

His narrative contains frequent repetitions and contradictions, is without colouring, and monotonous and his simple diction, which stands intermediate between pure Attic and the colloquial Greek of his time, enables us to detect in the narrative the undigested fragments of the materials which he employed. After the destruction of Carthage and Corinth assorted turmoil and pretenders in Asia. If you find a mistake though, please let me know! He finishes the book with an account of the traveller Iambulus ‘ journey to a group of islands in the Indian Oceanwhich appears to be based bibliothca a Hellenistic utopian novel.


(Book V, continued)

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Diodorus claims hisyorica the central subjects of the book are negative examples, who demonstrate the truth of these remarks. The remainder of the work saw a multiplicity of translators: Although that author gives too much weight to folk memories, he does show that a close reading of Diodorus can support other identifications on and near the constantly changing coast of Cornwall.

The end has been lost, so it is unclear whether Diodorus reached the beginning of the Gallic War as he promised at the beginning of his work or, as evidence suggests, old and tired from his labours he stopped short at 60 BC. In this book, Diodorus describes the mythology of Greece. This book covers the years BC BC, describing the disputes which arose between Alexander’s generals after his death and the beginning of the Wars of the Diadochoi.


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